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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
state. the q4000 is used to lift the blowout preventer. why are we using it? the reason we are doing it is because when it was brought and originally, it was to operate the manifold on the see that what -- seabed that allowed us to do this static -- excuse me, a dynamic attempt at the top killed. altman we did that by pumping mud and cement into that show client heard before that, we were having to kill the choke line with the q4000. it was never intended to be the primary lifting device. the reason we are using it is, on deck, it has the electrical connections and a computer that run the yellow pdod, which is the control pod that runs the hydraulic lines and vowels and operate the blowout preventer from the surface. we married the yellow pod with the q4000 at the start of the response. because of that, we are excepting some limitations on what they can do compared to what the "discover enterprise," can do. is the response of? >> yes. [unintelligible] do you see that as anything that might affect the response? >> i do not. >> thank you. >> i was wondering if you could talk about what
a reporter, i am all about news you can use. on this panel, we have hand- selected amazing folks, each an expert in the runway on different angles of reintegration within the military and the civilian world. i am going to bounce around a little bit. out of courtesy, i like to start with our wounded warriors. front and center, we have michael. he is a recently retired wounded warrior. he has a long medical road ahead. as a former army ranger and sergeant first class, michael is adapting to this change in mission. between ongoing surgery's, he is speaking to troops about reintegration and suicide prevention, even going back to iraq, where he was hit by an ied to talk to troops. optimisticht iis his mother and full-time caregiver. they have been blessed because she says when you look at mike, she worries about those who have unseen injuries and their families in need help reintegrating. down on me and, we have -- down on the end, we have a former marine reservist. she brings a unique perspective on reintegration trade as a female wounded warrior, as a full-time student, and as eight men t
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
plan to burn the islamic holy book to mark the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. the u.s. embassy in kabul has condemned the church's plan. elsewhere in afghanistan nato announced the u.s. soldier was skilled in fighting in the east on sunday. the fifth american death in afghanistan in september. also today it was widely reported that the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan has asked for 2,000 additional troops. general david petraeus wants them to join the 140,000 strong international force to help train afghan security forces. in pakistan today at least 19 people died and 40 more were wounded in a suicide bombing near a police station. the pakistani taliban claimed responsibility for the car bomb in the northwestern town. a spokesman said the bombing targeted police because they encourage residents to set up militias and fight the taliban. at least 44 people have died in landslides in guatemala, and dozens more are missing. heavy rains unleashed multiple landslides this weekend including on one of the country's main highways. rescue workers struggled today to try and free
ago was the closest in modern memory. the australian people told us and they told us this in no uncertain terms on that date and in the days that have followed is this. we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> last week, tony abbott described himself as the head of a government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede defeat. >> the coalition won more votes and more seats than our p opponent, but sadly we did not get a chance to form a government. >> australia has grown used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more fragile and raises the obvious question. how long will it last? >> one way you can cemented this government together is to spend a lot of money. julia gillard has started doing just that. she has promised almost 10 billion australian dollars to education and development. given the narrowness of the parliamentary majority now, all it would take would be for the liberal government to lose a single election sometime over the next few years, and australia would have to return to the polls. >> does that mean that you will
? >> luckily, we have cut the barnicle with some chris jansing and mr. dan senor is with us and margaret carlson, bloomberg news political columnist and washington editor of the week, good to have you with us. >> good to be with you. >> dan, you were in iraq within weeks of the invasion. >> vi day as you said to me earlier. i was underwhelmed by the speech. i thought it was lacking any context about where we go from here. i think the elephant in the room for many iraqis, and for many men and women in our military is will we go back? will we ever have to go back? how do we prevent ever going back? saying we're leaving and the end of it doesn't seem like sufficient. i think there are two scenarios for iraq. one is that it basically shrinks and becomes a glorified province of iran and gets swallowed up by iran or, two, we abandon the iraqis so much and they feel so alone that the only way they can defend themselves is they built an army of saddam proportions something of one former general said to me, a military that not only can play home games but can play away games, too. that is destabi
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
is an example of what we are up against. >> benjamin netanyahu thanked the u.s. president for his efforts and described the talks says "open and productive." >> id president's statement is an expression of our -- i think the president's statement is an expression of our determination to fight and you have talks that are open, productive, and serious in the quest for peace, also centered around the need for security arrangements that are able to roll back this kind of terror and threats to security. and that is a fundamental element, an important foundation of the peace we seek, and i appreciate, mr. president, your efforts to advance this beast -- peace for us and our neighbors and, i think we can say, the world. >> mr. obama also welcomed the leaders of the palestinian and the israelis. king abdullah and other leaders will join the talks. but is there it now and new commitment to achieve peace? our correspondent reports from the west bank on what are the unresolved tensions. >> on a hill overlooking the city of jerusalem, hundreds of jewish settlers came to bury the dead. the symmetry is
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)